Category Archives: digital citizenship

Week 2 – Quality Content

This week we were tasked at looking at the concept of digital citizenship, including Mike Ribble’s nine elements through our major project update.  Since the main goal for my major project is to guide students through the safe use of Instagram, TikTok, Snapchat and Flipgrid, I will focus on Ribble’s S3 Framework (Safe, Savvy and Social).

First, a quick update with my Instagram and TikTok highlights this week:

With each post I make on Instagram or TikTok, I try to imagine that I am a young user of the apps.  When I receive comments or direct messages, would these be appropriate considering the content I am posting?  Everything is fairly “lighthearted” with @callie.the.golden.pup, but I can’t help but think about the audience I am attracting. What if I flipped it and I was actually someone with inappropriate or dangerous intentions? I am attracting a young audience with my Instagram and TikTok accounts, so what if I used this as a way to lure my followers down a dangerous path?

This reminds me of some ‘Social Media Rules’ from MediaSmarts.ca :

  • I will only follow people I know personally.
  • I will always show an adult any message or post that makes me feel uncomfortable or threatened.
  • I will never share any personal information about myself, such as my age, where I live, and where I go to school.
  • I will keep my whereabouts to myself: I will turn off any location settings that tell people exactly where I am or where a photograph was taken.
  • I will never publish anything I wouldn’t want my parents, teachers, and grandparents to see, because photos can be shared widely, with anyone, in a matter of seconds.
  • When creating a password, I will make one up that is hard for someone else to guess but easy for me to remember. I will never reveal it to anyone (except my parents or a trusted adult) – not even my best friend.
  • I will always check my privacy settings and go over them with my parents.
  • I will practice the golden rule and always treat others as I would like to be treated. I will T.H.I.N.K. before I leave a comment or send a message: is it True, Helpful, Inspiring, Necessary, Kind?
  • I will not upload or tag photos of other people without their permission.

By using these guidelines and thinking about digital citizenship from a responsible use policy compared to an acceptable use policy (Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools), we can encourage our students and children to protect themselves and others. This is considered the base of digital citizenship as ‘Safety’ in Ribble’s S3 Framework.

acceptable

Instagram: @callie.the.golden.pup

We had a slower week on Instagram in terms of new followers, comments and likes. I continue to post at least daily, but I am struggling with coming up with some original content. I read an article, Everything You Need to Know About Doggo Lingo to try an incorporate the terminology in my captions and comments.

This week I received three direct messages from the same follower. Each message contained a picture that I was able to view once before disappearing.  This made me feel very uncomfortable, because I was a little afraid of what kind of picture I would be opening, especially since I do not know this follower personally.  What if it was something gross? Luckily it was just a picture of the dog, but it made me stop and think about my own social media rules. With Instagram, there are direct message photo options: View Once, Allow Replay, Keep in Chat. Additionally, you can “unsend” an image or message if the receiver has not opened the message. What are the implications of these kind of functions?

Questions/Plans for next week:

  • Should I comment on other posts to increase engagement?
  • Experiment with different hashtags and take advantage of common trends (like throwback thursday #tbt)
  • How engaged do I want to be with other followers? I might experiment with my follower engagement (replying to comments, liking more posts) this week to see how this affects the number of followers and likes.

TikTok @callie.the.golden.pup

TikTok was blowing up with new likes, comments and followers this week.  Each time I check the app, I have at least 5 new followers. Overall my content was a hit or miss though- I haven’t quite figured out what my followers “want”.  One thing I have noticed is that if I spend a lot of time on a post with captions and choosing a trending audio clip, I generally receive more views.  But that is the hard part – trying to find the time to watch enough TikTok videos to find something interesting to do with my dog, Callie.  I also find the video editing function on the app to be very challenging to use – it is hard to sync up the video and audio.

Questions/Plans for next week:

  • Look at my followers to see a trend (so far, it appears to be very young girls) – what kinds of videos receive the most likes?
  • Look at some pet accounts that have thousands (or millions) of views and likes.  What makes these accounts different or special?
  • Research some tips and tricks for video editing on TikTok
  • Using this article as a guide to increase engagement, I will:
    • participate in the daily TikTok “challenges”
    • reply to comments
    • post 3 times a day (I have a feeling this will be impossible, but maybe I can try!)

Flipgrid

My “everything you need to know” guide is a work in progress and should be complete in the next week! Stay tuned. As a teaser – there are some significant privacy and data sharing concerns with this app. As a result (and due to my school division policy), I am rethinking about how/if I will continue to use the app with my students.

Snapchat

Nothing new to report, but Snapchat is up next on my list to complete an ‘everything you need to know’ guide.  Last week I explained that I would not be adding Snapchat to my experiential list, but that I would still complete and app overhaul.  Through conversations with my students, it seems like it is one of the most used communication and messaging app.

Plans for next week:

  • Post Flipgrid “everything you need to know” guide
  • Instagram
    • try to increase engagement with followers
  • TikTok
    • Participate in daily challenges, post more frequently, engage with followers
    • Learn more about video editing within the app
  • Snapchat
    • Begin research for my app overhaul

Thank you for reading!  If there is anything you would love to have in my app “everything you need to know” guides, please let me know in the comments.

Until next time,

@Catherine_Ready

Friday Night Dinner – My Generational Divide Focus Group

Every Friday night, my family gathers for a big family dinner planned and executed by my mother. We call it “Friday Night Dinner” and it is something everyone looks forward to after a long week of work and school. I get to reconnect with my brothers and sisters and all the cousins run around and play. After dinner, we sit around our big dinner table and have conversations that usually bring out our generational divides (My parents, the 5 kids [siblings and myself], our partners and 7 grandkids).

In short, we have our very own ‘generational divide’ focus group that meets weekly to discuss the latest issues and trends in our world.  Generational stereotypes? Yup, we cover all those and more.c4552553a55501a39ae09446e1d519ce There are “OK, boomer” comments from the Gen Z’s, the Gen X’s calling the Millenials lazy (read my classmate Matteo’s post) and the phone-addicted Gen Z’s being anti-social in the corner. The Gen Alphas are usually in their own world, so there is still hope, right?

Although many sources use different birth years to determine your generation, I like this image below (from 2015), as it highlights and pokes fun at some of the typical opinions and experiences of each generation.   a-generation-gaps-bruce-feirstein-vf

During our class discussion, I wondered if being focused on generation gaps was something more prevalent today. But Dr. Couros showed us a few different magazine covers over the last 40 years, each one condemning the next generation as being lazy, entitled, etc. It appears that a common concern is that the next generation is “doomed” unless we do something about it. With an understanding of the gaps that exist between each generation, we can consider how these divides affect the world we are preparing our students for in the future.

What kind of world?

Gone are the days of sending students on prescribed educational paths that will result in 30-year careers in one industry.  Teachers are often told we are teaching students for jobs that do not even exist. In fact, “in many industries and countries, some of the most in-demand jobs didn’t even exist five or 10 years ago — and the pace of change will only accelerate” and since it is impossible to know what the future holds,  “the key to molding job-ready graduates is to teach students how to live — and learn — at the intersections” (Iste.com).

POG-illustration-500pxThese “intersections” are areas that interdisciplinary learning can take place and we can prepare our students by using models like ‘Portrait of a Graduate’.  Many organizations have created their own ‘portrait’, but here is an explanation by the Oxford School District based in Oxford, MS.  As educators, we have the task of preparing our students for the future by developing skills and a mindset to take on the challenges in their future world.  The world we are preparing our students for is constantly changing, so I think it is important that we focusing on developing relationships with our students, which will allow us to curate their passions and help students find their spark.

Do schools need to change?

The article “Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century” describes new skills that need to be taught to students that build on traditional literacy, research skills, technical skills, and critical analysis skills currently taught in the classroom. These include:

skills

“Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century” (p. 4)

In some ways, schools are already taking on these skills by incorporating the 4 C’s of 21st Century skills as described by my classmate Amanda in her post this week. Amanda explains that, “Cultivating a classroom environment around the 4 C’s also gives students the chance to become “knowledge-able” instead of just knowledgeable”.

Another classmate, Christina, explains that our schools need to change because our culture is changing and “We need to keep up with how the digital world is evolving or we will have students thrown into a world with no skills how to navigate it.”  As educators in a 21st century world, we have a responsibility to keep up with these changes as life long learners.  We can do this by participating in professional development, or taking relevant courses like EC&I 832!

(As a side note – consider reflecting on how you used technology in your first year as a teacher and compare it with the present day. The SAMR model is one way to consider our technology use and how it is evolving.)

I also think it is important to change how we frame digital citizenship conversations with our students.  This includes moving from a cyber safety or fear/avoidance based model to our current model that emphasizes actions a responsible citizen should take.  Last week, I created a video “What does it mean to be a (digital) citizen”, and I think it highlights the shift schools need to take with digital citizenship in schools.

What does citizenship look like in the future?

In the research for the video above, I found a lot of information about moving from a ‘personally responsible’ idea of digital citizenship and to consider using Westheimer’s framework of what it means to be a citizen.  This includes looking at the benefits of participatory and justice-oriented citizens online.

Kinds_of_Citizen

At this point, digital citizenship and citizenship are intertwined as life does not exist without the Internet anymore. As educators, it is more than managing a digital footprint, but rather acting ethically online with knowledge and empathy and making the transition towards ‘Digital Leadership’ as described by George Couros. I love this visual from Sylvia Duckworth and Jennifer Casa Todd.  We have the opportunity to inspire our students to find passion, influence others and make positive change!

diff-dig-cit-1-fi

Returning to my ‘Friday Night Dinner’ discussion at the beginning of the post, I am curious if we can shift our family conversation to look at the positives each generation has to offer.  The Millenials are pretty good digital citizens, but it is the grandkids that will make all the difference.  Everyday I learn something new from young people as they become digital leaders to promote positive change in our world.  Even though the current passions might be the ‘Renegade’ dance, there is no denying their commitment and dedication.  As educators, parents and adults in the lives of young people, we have the chance to cultivate these passions and help promote the wave of the future: digital leadership.

Until next time,

@Catherine_Ready

Week 1 – Building My Empire

I have two sisters (and two brothers) and we share funny memes and accounts through a group chat on Instagram on a daily basis.  We sometimes talk about how we spend too much time on our phones and this week we chatted about how we should unfollow accounts that make us feel anxious or unhappy.  At that moment, I realized I had hardly looked through my personal social media accounts because I was so focused on building my ‘Callie, the sweet and friendly Golden Retriever” empire.  Why is this relevant? Through my major project experiential journey of Instagram, TikTok, Snapchat and Flipgrid, I am quickly learning how time consuming these apps can be when you have specific goals in mind. Here is a little mini compilation of my top TikTok videos/Instagram experience this week (complete with a muted section at 1:00-1:21, due to a copyright claim):

And the nitty-gritty details of my progress this week:

Instagram: @callie.the.golden.pup

In my first major project post, I discussed my hesitation with using my personal life in a public account on both Instagram and TikTok.  So, I decided to use my dog, Callie as a prop and subject of my account. I followed these steps:

    1. Choose a username and make an account.
      • Apparently there are a lot of Golden Retrievers named Callie on Instagram, so I had to use some creative punctuation with the name
    2. Choose a profile picture and create a short bio
      • I briefly looked at different pet accounts, and lots of accounts included the date of birth of their animal and sometimes a flag for the country. I decided to against giving away my location and only added the D.O.B.
      • I chose a nice close up photo of Callie for the profile picture
    3. Make your first post
      • I made the first post before following any accounts – that way potential accounts would see my content if they decide to follow back. This is not based on any research, just my own idea
    4. Use relevant hashtags and format post in a particular style IMG_2344
      • I Googled: “top golden retriever hashtags instagram” and copied the list to my Notes app on my iPhone. **You can only use 30 hashtags per post
      • To create a post with multiple lines, I remember learning from my niece that if you write the caption in the Notes app and format it with dots and lines, the formatting will stay when you copy the caption to Instagram. Why? I have no idea. Maybe something to look into!
    5. Start following accounts and liking photos (I looked at a few of the different hashtags for inspiration).
    6. Continuing posting more content (at least daily), like a variety of posts and follow relevant (dog related) accounts.

Within the first week, I have 145 followers (and counting) and lots of weird interactions with other dog accounts. (Did you know there is a certain “dog” way to write on the Internet? ‘DoggoLingo‘- using words like ‘hooman’ instead of human and ‘doggo’ instead of dog. And some accounts ask if I want to be their ‘fwend’. Weird). With my early success of gaining followers, I read an article “How to make your dog Instagram famous” and learned about some of the ins and outs of the pet Instagram world.

Here are some interesting revelations and interactions on the Instagram with @callie.the.golden.pup.

  • Direct messages to be “fwends”
  • Requests to be brand ambassadors from pet companies
  • Direct messages to join “follow loops” to help other pet accounts gain more followers
  • ‘Suggested accounts’ to follow – as a result, some people from my personal life are following my pet account – which is a little awkward (especially when my siblings start making fun of me for having too much time on my hands).

As I continue my experiential assignment, I am starting to make a list of questions for my research overhaul of Instagram in a few weeks:

  • Privacy – what are the implications of becoming a ‘brand ambassador’? Do I really want to give my home address to a random company in exchange for free merchandise?
  • Direct messages – why? Do you need to be concerned about catfishing or luring?
  • What is the correlation between liking posts, following accounts and receiving more likes and follows?
  • How many posts per day for maximum engagement?
  • Best hashtags?

TikTok @callie.the.golden.pup

TikTok is a bit of uncharted territory for me, as I only started to use the app at the end of November 2019 as part of EC&I 831. Since then I have watched a lot of videos, and continued to follow trends through my nieces’ accounts.

    1. Choose a username and create an account
      • I used the same name as Instagram for continuity and to help with cross-promotion (if that is even a thing with Instagram and TikTok – something to explore)
    2. Profile picture and short bio
      • Again, same as Instagram to keep it simple
    3. Upload your first video
      • I have lots of dog videos on my phone from the last two years of Callie’s life, so I chose a funny audio clip that my nieces used a few times. I figured it must be current and trending.
      • Use hashtags, but most importantly the #foryou or #fyp – more on that later when I do my overhaul of TikTok.
    4. Watch the views, likes and follows come in
      • 500 views in the first two days! 35 likes and a few new follows
      • Different than Instagram, but it appears that views are more important than likes. I think.
    5. Watch lots and lots of videos
      • Part of your success on TikTok depends on staying on top of trends, which you can accomplish by watching hours of videos and adding certain audio clips to a “favourites” tab

Pretty easy! Until I uploaded my next few videos and received less than 100 views per video, sometimes less than 10 views! How is this even possible? I read a lot of articles trying to understand the TikTok algorithm , but it doesn’t make any sense to me or the Internet world. Then I uploaded a video that received almost 1300 views and over 230 likes! What made this video special? Is the content better? I am also noticing a lot of my new followers appear to be young girls (definitely under the recommended age to use the app).

A few questions to consider when I complete my TikTok overhaul:

  • Likes, follows, views – how does this affect engagement? Do I need to follow/like other accounts to receive more attention?
  • Safety/privacy concerns with a young follower base (it looks like a lot of young girls  are following my dog account on TikTok – but what if I was actually an online predator? These are the kind of questions running through my head on a daily basis).
  • How often do you need to post to maintain engagement? Do captions matter (I get a bigger response when I ask a question in my caption)?

Flipgrid

I decided to use Flipgrid with two Grade 7/8 classes at my school. Part of the reason I chose these classes is that one class used Flipgrid two years ago, so I thought they would be able to give me a few tips and tricks.

    1. Read the “Getting Started” post and Educator’s Guide to Flipgrid
    2. Create an educator profile (using my school division Google account)
    3. Create a “grid” – one for each Grade 7/8 class.
    4. Give students some time to explore the functions of Flipgrid before creating a topic.
      • I wanted students to be creative with filters, stickers, text, etc when creating their videos. This also gave me a chance to learn about possible issues with the app.

A few things I learned/questions about Flipgrid this week:

  • Some students showed me how to “add a sticky”, so that you can write out what you want to say when recording. This way you aren’t looking away from the camera while recording. The sticky disappears when you post the video.
  • How do you delete a video that you posted? It is not as intuitive as you think and requires a few steps.
  • Each video shows the number of views – does this make students feel uncomfortable? Is there a way to remove this setting?
  • Privacy/safety – the grid is only available to someone with the link, but how do you guarantee privacy? We talked about use stickers or emojis to cover student faces if they feel uncomfortable.
  • My division policy using Flipgrid – something I will discuss in more detail this week during my app overhaul.

Snapchat

After the first week of daily TikTok, Instagram and Flipgrid use, I realize that I need to adjust my goals for the major project. I don’t feel that Snapchat fits into an ‘experiential’ piece, as I have already used the app daily for over four years. That being said, I am still very curious about the safety, privacy and terms of service guidelines of Snapchat and will complete a research overhaul as planned. I will continue to use the app daily, although will not report on my use in the same way as TikTok, Instagram and Flipgrid. I also feel like there are not enough hours in the day to use all this social media effectively!

Plan for next week:

  • Complete the Flipgrid overhaul
  • Instagram
    • Do some research on how to receive more engagement on Instagram – better hashtags? Posting at certain times of day?
  • TikTok
    • Participate in trending challenges/hashtags – does this increase views/likes?
    • Try some of the tips from this article to get on the ‘For You Page’
  • Flipgrid
  • Snapchat
    • Continue my typical daily use (sending baby snaps and maintaining snapstreaks)

If you read this far, thank you! I have a lot of work I would like to complete with this project, especially when it comes to data privacy and safety.  My ultimate goal:

Guide students and children through the safe use of

Instagram, TikTok, Snapchat and Flipgrid

Until next time,

@Catherine_Ready

Social Media and Mental Health

Last week, we had the pleasure of having Mary Beth Hertz discuss digital citizenship and media literacy with our class.  What a wealth of knowledge she has!!  I was left feeling awed and also completely incompetent as someone who thinks of themself as i-dont-know-2e2ed5“tech literate.”  Boy, do I have a lot to learn!! Mary Beth brought up so many ideas I never really thought about as an online user and as a teacher.

I have always encouraged my students to be smart on social media, and we always discuss the media world but after listening to Mary Beth, I know I can do a better job.  One of the ideas that really stood out to me and made me think more critically was the ideas of online and offline identities and the blurred line in between – they are the same thing now.  I think the online world is a great place for people to explore their identity and find other people with the same interests and ideologies as themselves, especially in this giant world.  For some small town kids in Moose Jaw, SK, the world can feel pretty small.  Having an online identity can allow teens to explore beyond the confines of our small city and make connections with real people across the globe.  I love the idea that some of my students can be completely different people in the online world, whether it be a persona or finding a group of people they really connect with when they lack those connections elsewhere.  The thing that stands in the way is that they need to be smart and educated about how to interact with people online, and how to protect themselves. I know when I was a teen, I was on MSN Messenger 24/7 and often ended up online playing games or on platforms like Whyville.  I was so vulnerable and my parents had no idea what I was doing, and realistically, neither did I.  We lied about our age all the time to get on chat rooms, or access different parts of a website that were 13+.  Looking back, I was probably dumb more than a couple of times, but the consequences were quite less than they are today.  Teens think they know everything about the online world, and in most cases, they definitely know a lot, but the difficult part is making them listen.

raise your hand

Raise your hand if you’ve felt personally victimized by a teen eye roll?

If looks could kill, am I right?  We discussed a lot about cookies and tracking as well in our class and I couldn’t help but think of ways to make my students listen to this!  I care for these kids so much, and all I want is the best for them.  I don’t want them to fall for some crazy scheme, be catfished, stalked, or tracked by any hooligan online.  Nor do I want my students to feel bullied, or worthless just because some model on instagram can pay for high quality photoshop or hire someone to follow her around snapping pictures.  Mental health is a huge issue for teens, and I agree with Mary Beth when she said social media is a huge influencer of this.  In fact, there is an actual list of the top 5 worst social media apps for mental health — instagram being at the top of this list.  I feel for children growing up in this era, as it must be difficult to see so many people online “living the dream” when the reality is so much different.  As we discussed in class, things aren’t always what they seem, and FOMO although feels real, is not all there is to life.  It is so important to teach students about these ideas and concepts, and also allow them to know it’s okay to feel a certain way, but compartmentalize it, and go back to the real world.  You live there, not online.

Most of my students feel like they get preached at for being safe online.  They “already know” or “learned this already.”  In my grade 12 ELA classes, we discuss media and the messages out there.  This semester, I asked them to pay attention to the advertisements they saw online for one day and find one to bring to class.  We then analyzed it using Aristotle’s Appeals.

aritstotle
Aristotle’s Appeals

I made them dissect these advertisements and we talked about why they are great ads, or why they are fake, why they call to the person, and what they really want.  Of course, lots of people have done this in classes, but I think the trick to getting students to buy in is to get them involved.  I cannot lecture them about how to be safe online (let’s face it, I’m young — but not THAT young), instead I have to involve them in the practices and let them discover WHY they need to be safer online.  We need to talk about the dangers and the facts together, and hopefully through these experiences, they learn why it’s important to fact check, why it’s important not to send that picture, and think about why it’s important they protect their digital identity.

Until next time,

Shelby

An evening with Mary Beth Hertz

This week during our EC&I 832 Zoom session, we had an excellent presentation and conversation with Mary Beth Hertz, author of “Digital and Media Literacy in the Age of the Internet” and current high school art/technology teacher.

We shouldn’t be teaching kids to be afraid of social media, or that technology is bad for them. We should treat these tools like any influence in their life and help them manage the responsibilities connected to these tools effectively and ethically.Mary Beth Hertz

There were many takeaways from our conversation, but for the purpose of this post I will focus on my top three:

  1. Learning how the Internet works
  2. Validating what our children/students are doing online
  3. Understanding bias

1. Learning how the Internet works

Hertz explained that part of her high school technology course begins with teaching and learning about how the Internet works – from IP addresses, Wi-Fi, and cookies.  This discussion made me realize I vaguely know what is going on, but not enough to explain it to my students.  Hertz believes it is important for students to understand how their devices connect to the outside world, as well as privacy and safety with the devices. For example, what are the concerns with using the free Wi-Fi in a coffee shop vs your password protected Wi-Fi in your home? What are the safety concerns with being connected to an Alexa or Google Home? Hertz explains that part of being literate in a digital world is understanding the implications of technology, even if you don’t understand the functionality. 

giphy

via GIPHY

Takeaway? We (as educators) need a basic understanding of the Internet to guide our students in a digital world!

2. Validating what are children/students are doing online

In a discussion of some popular apps like Snapchat and TikTok, we highlighted the obsessions or unhealthy communities young people find online.  Hertz focused on the idea that kids are not necessarily addicted to social media, but instead addicted to each other.  We also talked about Manoush Zomoradi, who dedicates an entire episode of her podcast, ‘Note to Self’ about the pressures of maintaining Snapstreaks. I encourage you to listen to the relatively short episode to understand the phenomenon (especially if you are obsessed with streaks, like myself! Going on Day 1038 with my niece…)

That being said, Hertz believes it is possible to teach young people self-regulation and reflection when it comes to technology use.  Another comment she made was that preparing our students to use their time wisely used to be a technology teacher’s job – but now everyone needs to be involved. How to use technology responsibly (and further discussions of digital citizenship) need to be included every time we use technology in the classroom or with our children.  Hertz explains that we should understand that there is value in what they are doing online, and we can validate this by acknowledging the digital divide among our students. Amanda and Daina provide excellent descriptions of Digital Equity and that young people fall into three categories when it comes to technology use.  They are described in an article shared by Hertz as Digital Orphans, Digital Exiles and Digital Heirs.

Takeaway? We need to build relationships with our students so we can understand and appreciate what they are doing online.

3. Understanding bias

maxresdefault

Hertz described bias in a way that was very easy to understand and I immediately started using it with my students this week.  If you are reading something (like “news”), and it makes you feel a certain way (an emotion), then you likely have bias as the author is trying to influence how you feel.  She also explained that bias is very difficult to teach because nothing is just news anymore and articles often lack context.  There is so much media bias and fake news online, how do we teach it as educators?  One suggestion from Hertz was to use AllSides.com, a website dedicated to providing balanced news.  We also need to look at where these biases originate, like from parents as inherited preferences (especially related to politics) or in our own cognitive biases that influence decisions.  This discussion lead towards the importance of fact checking and how ‘Reading Laterally’  helps our students fall out of the trap of not trusting anything.  We need to be a little be skeptical when we read online, but we can help our students by giving them the tools to understand how to avoid being fooled online  and how to make sense of bias.

Takeaway? We need to help our students understand bias and how it influences what we read online. 

As an arts education teacher, I have started talking about digital citizenship and how we use technology with students, even if it feels unrelated to arts ed.  Mary Beth Hertz helped me realize that if you are using technology with students, these conversations about technology need to take place.  It is not only the classroom teacher or the parents’ job – we all have a part in shaping mindful technology users and responsible digital citizens.

Until next time,

@Catherine_Ready

My Major Project – An Outline

Since this class began, I’ve been spending quite a bit of time thinking about my major project.  What would I like to do?  What do I have time to do?  What do I have an interest in finding out more about?  I feel like I’m pretty tech-savvy and the idea of researching more about the apps we use daily was intriguing, but what I finally settled on was developing some media literacy and digital citizenship resources for my classroom.

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Anyone who know me, knows I’m a planner.  I LOVE unit and lesson planning – I think it’s fun to create different projects and plan out how to teach students different topics, and I get to be creative which is my favourite part.  Just ask Brad how insanely organized my courses are.  The best part about planning is everyone does it differently, and has their own approach and I love how two people can look at the same curriculum, and interpret it so differently, and design units and lessons that are totally different, yet address the same ideas.

So back to my topic.  I have decided to go with option one: development of a curriculum-supported digital citizenship/literacy resource.  I made this decision because 1) I like planning, and 2) I have noticed there are less sources directed to high school media literacy and digital citizenship explicitly.  I think it would be very beneficial for myself to create a resource package to use in my classrooms and share with other teachers as well.  5a5343f99e00de5d5277df0111180fd5My starting point will be to investigate a course I’ve become very familiar with over the last 4 years: ELA B30.  This course has become my baby and I have tweaked and perfected it over the last four years I’ve taught it.  I don’t know why, but I’m never satisfied and I find there is always another outcome I feel like I need to hit in a better way, which leads into how digital citizenship fits in.  The curriculum states: “View, comprehend, and evaluate critically a variety of visual and multimedia texts by international, including indigenous, artists and authors from various cultural communities, and identify how the texts address beliefs, values, and power” (CR B30.2) which leads into lots of conversations about critically viewing and evaluating the world apps, social media, connected, smartphone, app store, play store, social media, business app, app for your businesswe live in.  I think this outcome would be an excellent fit for some knowledge on digital citizenship and media literacy.  Then there is the outcome: “Create a visual or multimedia presentation that suits the topic, purpose, and audience; teaches others about a global social issue; and persuades them to act on the issue in a responsible manner”(CC B30.2) which I believe fits nicely into the topic of media literacy for an upcoming generation.  This curriculum is wide open to interpretation and that’s why I think it’s a perfect fit for this project.

To begin more indepth research for this project, I’m going to start by looking closely at some other resources out there, and evaluating them. I’ve already found a couple on Twitter!  I may even organize my unit and plans in an LMS, like Google Classroom since it is a platform I’m familiar with and will use often.  I will also be checking out Ribble’s nine elements of digital citizenship.

To make sure I stay on track and am within Saskatchewan’s guidelines, I will be looking at the Saskatchewan’s Digital Citizenship Continuum and the Saskatchewan’s Digital Citizenship Policy Planning Guide as per Alec’s recommendation.

Wish me luck!! 🙂

Shelby

 

 

EC&I 831 – Summary of Learning

My final summary of learning for EC&I 831: Social Media and Open Education:

In my summary of learning, I wanted to capture everything I have learned over the last few months. I thought it would be fun to incorporate the top 5 social media apps that we discussed in the course and challenge myself to use or understand the apps.

  • Snapchat (user for the last 3 years)
  • TikTok (user for 1 week)
  • Instagram (user for the last 8 years)
  • YouTube (user for 12 years – my first upload was July 2007!)
  • VSCO (user for 5 years, but only recently understanding the VSCO Girl concept)

I hope the brief social media interludes in the video highlight some of the obsessions and common uses of the apps. I will say one thing – if you have not downloaded TikTok, be careful. I fell into a deep, dark hole of videos for over 2 hours…you’ve been warned!

Secondly, I originally wanted to include Rick Mercer style rants addressing the main issues and topics in EC&I 831. I quickly realized that it is impossible to film in the “rant” style as a solo videographer with a selfie-stick and an iPhone. In the video, I discuss the topics that resonated with me the most:

Lastly, I tried to incorporate all my editing skills acquired over the last couple months with WeVideo, like video overlaying.

I hope you enjoy the video!

@Catherine_Ready

P.S. Thank you to my sister and brother-in-law for letting me use their business, Assiniboia Gallery to record the video. No baby or dog distractions!

My Summary of Learning

This is it!  The end of EC&I 830!  I cannot believe how fast this course flew by, and I also cannot believe how much I learned over two short months.  It’s amazing the community we developed and how much we were able to challenge each other to grow and learn in such a short time span.  It’s been a pleasure to learn with all of you.

I loved the style of this course and how it enabled us to be in charge of our own learning.  We brought a lot of debate to the table, and I thank all of you for challenging my thinking and opinions.  There is no one right answer to any of the topics we discussed and I think that makes this course so great!

Without further ado, here is my summary of learning video!  Thanks again all for a fantastic class and I hope you all enjoy my video (I had a lot of fun making it)!

Social Media – An Outlet for Our Children

When I began this week, I stood firmly on the agree side when the question was asked, “Is social media ruining childhood?”  Of course, social media is ruining childhood!  How couldn’t it be?  Why do I not see children gathering outside?  Playing hopscotch?  Skipping?  Shooting hoops?  Riding bikes with their friends?  Using their imagination to build forts?  Because, social media controls their lives.

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Click here for 25 things you don’t see anymore; and maybe some nostalgia too!

They no longer need to go find their friends, play these games, or use their imagination the way I did growing up, because they have a device that connects them to their friends, their device has the games, and their device allows them to be creative in other ways.  Is this entirely a bad thing?  No, I don’t think it is.

 

After the debate this week, I had many thoughts on the topic.  I thought both sides of the debate did a fantastic job: Melinda, Allysa and Lori has some excellent points that made me nod my head and solidified my idea that social media is ruining childhood.  They discussed the rise in anxiety, and cyber-bullying online, as well as the pressure kids feel to fit in, and how many of these problems are because children ignore the age restrictions, and parents are left in the dark – oblivious, or conscious of these decisions.

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The disagree side is what started to sway me: Erin, Brooke and Daniel made some strong arguments towards the positives of social media, including the idea that it strengthens children’s relationships, creates a community, and they become more aware than children of past generations.

After both of these arguments, my original ideas were up in the air.  I think the biggest difficulty for me was that I was stuck on the nostalgic idea of what my own childhood was like and that kids today were missing out!  There was so much good before technology took over and I remember creating my own fun in the backyard, riding my bike all over town to meet up with friends, the new addition of MSN to my teenage years, and no social media.  I grew up in the nineties and I am in awe at how fast things changed.  I think I was stuck in the idea that I had the best childhood, so of course social media is ruining now-a-days children’s childhood because they are having such different experiences than I did 20 years ago.

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Once I got past the idea that children today aren’t missing out; their childhood is just different with different opportunities and different challenges.  I think yes, there are a lot of potential risks of over-using social media, and the risk of addiction for teens is very real.  I had a couple of grade nines almost cry when I took their phones away for one day for a health experiment.  Cyber-bullying is also a very real concern, and it is something I deal with daily in a high school setting.  Unfortunately, cyber-bullying is worse than just bullying because it can follow a child home, and follows them every time they log online.  This infograph does an excellent job of explaining just how prominent cyber-bullying is, and the different ways it is visible to teens.

However, as the disagree team pointed out, the online world can also be a great place for community development and support.  When I am teaching about mental health, I always suggest using online resources to find supports if students are struggling but after Monday, it clicked.  Students develop their own communities and support groups online social-media-community-cohesionfor isolation, bullying, gender inequality, racism, etc.  and this is awesome!!  Another point the disagree team made was that students are able to explore their interests and ideas online, making connections to other students all over the world who are like-minded individuals and all of a sudden, they aren’t alone anymore and I think that is fantastic.  Of course, there are risks associated with this idea, like pedophiles profiling and “cat-fishing” young children into meeting up or earning trust to have children partake in risky behavior, however, this is where education is key.  Parents also need to be aware of the behavior of their children and not let them loose online.  Teach them and discuss social media etiquette.

The article, The Impact of Social Media on Children, Adolescents, and Families had some great tips specifically for pediatricians to help parents talk to their children about social media:

  1. Advise parents to talk to their children and adolescents about their online use and the specific issues that today’s online kids face.
  2. Advise parents to work on their own participation gap in their homes by becoming better educated about the many technologies their youngsters are using.
  3. Discuss with families the need for a family online-use plan that involves regular family meetings to discuss online topics and checks of privacy settings and online profiles for inappropriate posts. The emphasis should be on citizenship and healthy behavior and not punitive action, unless truly warranted.
  4. Discuss with parents the importance of supervising online activities via active participation and communication, as opposed to remote monitoring with a “net-nanny” program (software used to monitor the Internet in the absence of parents)

The real goal is to help students develop a positive online identity and understand the consequences of posting risky photos or videos online.  Just because you do something when you are young, means it will follow you online for the rest of your lives.  They need to understand that the things they say and do on social media is permanent and can harm their futures.  I think this is also why, as teachers, we need to teach healthy digital citizenship to children from a young age, so that when they reach adolescence, they are better equipped to navigate this online world.

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On top of this, students are more aware of their country, and the world they live in.  Having instant connection to social media and news, things spread fast and they are on top of it.  Often students are advocating for causes, researching bias of opinion and using social networking sites to trend important issues like #blacklivesmatter, #metoo, #prayfordouglas, or even something like #humboldtstrong.  These kids have power at their finger tips, and once they realize it, things could start happening for our future, and our planet.  The Learning Network says, “We’ve become the most tolerant and conscious generation to date, with 76 percent of Gen Zers concerned about humanity’s influence on the Earth and 60 percent hoping the job they choose impacts the world.”  I think a large part of this is due to social media, in creating an open dialogue for a lot of these issues, like climate change, racism, gender equality, political campaigns, mental health awareness, and so many more.  People are able to connect with others online, and start discussions that matter, whereas in the past, we have been limited to the beliefs of the people around us physically.

What-children-need-most-1.jpgI think Melinda had a great point, when she said in her blog, “There needs to be a balance, kids need to be kids and play outside, rough house, interact, etc. They don’t need to have 24/7 screen time, they need to be active and imaginative.”  And to sum up, I think social media can be a great outlet for children, but it is not the only outlet.  Like Melinda said, kids still need to be kids, explore, and develop in the real world, be active and engaged, but I think there are a lot of great things we can expect from this generation as they become more tolerant, and engaged in the issues occurring in our world.

Openness In Education Reality Check

This week’s debate really made me think.  I started somewhere in the middle; on one side, sharing is a fantastic opportunity for our students to learn important practices, share their accomplishments, and interact with other like-minded people around the globe.  On the other hand, sharing can create a lot of issues with privacy, as well as cyber-bullying and consent to use specific photos posted online. This dynamic created a lot of debate in our class this week, and honestly a lot of debate in my own head.  g

Whenever the ideas of privacy laws and practices come up, it can be a very controversial and scary idea. What if what we post is wrong? What if we get in trouble? Can I lose my job for this? There are no shortage of horror stories out there to scare teachers into 6.gifnever posting a single thing on the internet again; class or non-class related.  I too, often think and rethink what I share online about my students, which to be honest is very limited. Beyond team, athletic, and grad photos, I hardly post about my students online. Everything remains nameless and it is almost always acelebration of accomplishments.

I think the biggest struggle I had with this week’s debate was a lot of the focus was on the
elementary stand-point and teaching young students how to be responsible online.  What should you post?  What shouldn’t you post?  A lot of conversations circled around the idea of parents being super involved with their child’s tech use and also the teacher helicopter-parent-main-imageoverseeing the practices. Seesaw, I’ve learned, is a great tool to engage parents and create important conversations with kids at home.  This technology is awesome because it can often bridge the gap between school and home life.  However, there is the down side of over-involvement of parents and the idea of “helicoptering.”  In fact, Robyn Treyvaud states in her article, Dangers of Posting Pictures Online, that “more than 1 in 4 children admit to feeling worried, embarrassed, or anxious when their parents post photos of them on social media,” which goes beyond the idea of hovering or helicoptering.  I know many of my friends are having children right now and seriously, the amount of “baby spam” I see in a day is ridiculous and the consequences can be even more serious!  It’s something I don’t think my generation really understands, making it even more important for the next generation to comprehend!  What parents post, even at a very young age, can affect a child’s mental health later on in life?  It begs the questions, do you want the whole world to see a baby photo of you?

I think both sides of the debate did a fantastic job of making their case!  When it comes to my world in a high school, photos, technology and phones are everywhere.  We even have a school Snapchat and Instagram account run by the Spirit Committee, run by a print screen.pngcouple of awesome teachers!  My students are on their phones constantly; I use Remind 101 to contact students and my athletes for various things like deadlines, practice changes, or just general reminders for the next day.  It allows my students to connect me as well without directly having my phone number. I also use Google Classroom for all the students’ homework, assignments, deadlines, and I also used it for Track and Field this year – creating an online platform for athletes to access permission forms, schedules, dates, and results.  It worked fantastically and never thought twice about using these online platforms with my students. However, everything I use and do online is “private.” I’m not sharing student photos to the internet, not posting on Twitter about our interactive activities, and although I feel my students are safe because of this, maybe I’m not properly preparing them for the online world?

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My Google Classroom!

I feel like it is my responsibility to help teach and guide my students through this online world they have become accustomed to.  I loved Amy’s point this week: “We need to stop
telling students how to live, but instead empower them to make the correct decisions regarding technology. We want students who use their powers for good, we do not want passive students.  Teachers can have an influence.
”  I think especially at the high school
level, students need to be empowered and use technology for good, like Amy said, instead of being the passive “likers” online.

Randi Zuckerberg stated in his article that, “technology and the world around us is evolving so quickly that even children a few years apart may experience two very different forms of childhood.” And I think this couldn’t be more true.  I know my childhood was vastly different than kids today and even looking at my current students.  I graduated high school nine years ago, and THINGS HAVE CHANGED.  EVERYTHING HAS CHANGED! I think it’s important that we don’t shut down these differences and Online-Worldinstead we embrace them, because if we don’t, they we run the risk of not helping our students be successful in the outside world. Their world is online, and it will continue to be for the rest of their lives.  They need to learn how to adapt and post appropriately online and protect themselves.  It lends itself to the idea that we cannot protect our students by banning the internet or posting pictures online because what is that teaching them?  They will rebel, and in turn post inappropriately online because they were never taught, nor was it modeled for them.

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I think digital literacy and creating a positive digital footprint is incredibly important for students.  What is the first thing their employer will do? Google them. What is the first thing someone just getting to know them will do?  Google them. They need to understand that their online identity will exist online whether they want it to or not. If they do not create it for themselves, and twist it into the story they want to tell, someone else will tell the story for them.  I think once students understand this concept, the rest becomes more simple than we think.

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It becomes about education, about what they want a future spouse, family, employer, etc. to see online. There are many dangers to the online world, but the opportunities and positives far outweigh these negatives.  “Students are, for the most part, growing up in this digital world without any explicit or universally adopted rules about how to behave, and there is little guidance available to adults. As our digital connections and interactions grow, the lines between our education and personal lives, our career and private activities, become blurred” (EdTek White Paper, 1) and it is our job to help advocate for ourselves and for our students online.  I know after this week, I am going to try to be more involved with their online world and help my students navigate it.  I feel as though it is my responsibility as an educator to do this much for them and prepare them for their future, and their online portfolio that is all their own and no one else’s.