Category Archives: TLL Masters

The Mindful Grey: EC&I 830 Summary of Learning

Wow, there just are no words. It’s cliche but that first class went by in a flash! Please enjoy my summary of learning. I keep trying to push myself outside of my comfort zones; from podcasts to videos…and now this. Slam poetry! Yes, you read that right, slam poetry…or my attempt at it.

None of this learning would have been possible without you all; so thank you for joining me on this snippet of my journey. Best wishes on your own path.

Wordart by Cloudform Slideshow by Prezi Video by WeVideo Slam Poetry by Moi

Until we meet again…

Playing the Digital Footprint Devil’s Advocate

And traversing the online teaching frontier… (Debates 7&8)

What happens when you have to debate as the opposition on a topic you wholeheartedly support? Short answer: It gets very messy inside your mind very quickly! When I volunteered to switch my stance for this debate and play “devil’s advocate,” I was almost exclusively thinking of one of my favourite books, Think Again, by Adam Grant.

In his book, Grant outlines how to develop the habit of thinking again: think like a scientist, define your identity in terms of values not opinions, and (of most importance here) seek out information that goes against your views. Make no mistake, despite how I debated Monday night, I am firmly in support of teachers and schools having a role in the development of children’s digital footprints. Of course, I wanted to see if I could convince myself of the opposite viewpoint…even just a little.

If I can inject one book plug that I feel strongly correlates with this course, it’s definitely Think Again by Adam Grant!

As always, let’s turn to the facts before I jump in with my final reflections (revealed in the video below…)

Strapped for time? Aren’t we all? Jump to the 22:52 minute mark to hear my final takeaways.
To add your own points or reiterate points you believe most essential to this debate, please join the Jamboard here: Digital Footprint Jamboard

Debate 7 Final Reflection and Leftover Questions

In the end, I cannot dispute that teachers and schools play a role in helping students develop their digital footprints (you got me there, Rae and Funmi!). As educators, we act as guides for our students navigating a physical and now digital world. After playing devil’s advocate, the one caveat I can make in this case is that the development of student digital identities does not START with teachers and cannot END with them either. The responsibility is shared. We owe it to our children to hold parents, teachers/schools/divisions, governments, and online platforms accountable for creating safe online spaces for our children to explore their digital identities.

  • As an educator (or similar), do you feel adequately supported by parents, your school/division, and professional resources/development when teaching students about digital citizenship and footprints?
  • If you have received excellent resources and/or PD on this topic (to use with students), please share in the comments, including how it guided your classroom lessons and use of tech.
  • How often do you check the terms of service agreement before signing off on something? Tell me I’m not the only one signing my life away 🙂
You can begin to take action here: Humans Rights Watch: Students Not Products

“I can’t but we can.”

-Anon.
Just as Big Oil and Gas companies made it the responsibility of individuals to clean up pollution in the ’70s/’80s, Big Tech companies seek to make it the individual’s (AKA: teachers) job to clean up “online pollution.”
Like anything worth fighting for/changing/improving, creating a safe online world for our children’s digital identities is going to take a global village. Image credit: @brenna.quinlan art and posted/reshared with permission @chicksforclimatechange

Traversing the online teaching frontier…I think I got lost in Timbuktu – Debate 8

I was still reeling from my own debate (I really dislike pushing a one-sided viewpoint. Objectivity. ALL. THE. WAY!), but the subsequent online learning debate delivered a double-whammy to my solar plexus! I’ve been teaching online for almost 3 years now. To suggest it’s been detrimental to the social and academic development of the children I’ve worked with feels like a personal attack. It’s not, of course. Once more, I turn to the facts before I will jump in with my reflection…littered with 3 years of positive and negative experiences.

Strapped for time? Yup, I hear ya! Head over to the 18:25 minute mark to hear my final reflections.
To add your own points or reiterate points you believe most essential to this debate, please join the Jamboard here: Online Learning Jamboard

Debate 8 Final Reflections and Leftover Questions

After reading all the articles and listening to the debators and my classmates discuss this topic, I keep coming back to my own experiences over the last few years. I have the unique vantage point of having taught in the rushed, uncharted dynamic of the pandemic and then in a more developed, purposeful role as an OLST (online learning support services teacher). Teaching students from every school in every grade in my division is not for nothing. The highs and lows of online learning have changed me as an educator; changed my definitions of schools, classrooms, and teaching. To say that online learning is detrimental to students generalizes the concepts of physical schools and education as one-size-fits-all definitions. That is certainly not the case. When done properly, and by that, I mean MINDFULLY, online education can become a digital anchor for many families needing something different. Physical schools will always be needed, but online education is the perfect alternative.

  • If you’re so inclined, please tell me about your own teaching experiences during the pandemic. Mine was oddly positive, but I know experiences vary greatly!
  • How do you think pandemic teaching and current online teaching differ? Or do you think they do?
  • What would you say to a family considering online? What factors should be taken into consideration?
  • How do you feel about your own online education? Does it seem like a viable option as opposed to being on-campus? What works for you and what doesn’t?

Thank you for joining this learning journey. One master’s class down…many more to go! Best wishes to you all!

Hello, Is It Me You’re Trying to Ban?

The Trouble with Blanket Statements, Rules and Rose-tinted Glasses…

Post 5: Debates 5&6 – Social Media is ruining childhood / Cell phones should be banned in schools.

Meme created by author using https://imgflip.com/memegenerator

At the mere mention of cell phones, I knew I couldn’t bypass a little Adele/Lionel Ritchie meme action. Lionel represents the nostalgia I feel for my pre-WIFI/social media youth; Adele symbolizes a more modern perspective on cell phone inclusive classrooms. Dare I digress into the obvious dad joke? Who knew it could all meme so much? Groooooooan!

Two things set this post apart from previous reflections. First, these debate topics seem so interrelated I felt I could finally make a single Monday-night blog entry! Second, (are you ready for it?) I’m completing all of this on my iPhone, from the meme to the Spotify podcast. If we suggest that students can and should use their cell phones for educational purposes, I want to test the practice for myself. As a fairly tech-savvy geriatric millennial, how hard can it be?

20 years later….okay, actually 5 hours, I can tell you….time-consuming but a uniquely fun experience (for me). If you only have time to skip around on my podcast or no time at all (June is something!) scroll down to my questions. I would love to hear your opinions and experiences!

Guess what? If you use Spotify on your phone, you can listen to me on high speed (chipmunk style) so I don’t ramble on and on and on! Join me for my first Podcast (brought to you by the Anchor Phone App). Debate 5: Social media is ruining childhood.

Kipp’s Debate 5 Questions:

  • Do you think you view your childhood/generation with rose-tinted glasses? Do you think everything was as golden as we claim it was, or were there many issues that were swept under the rug, now brought to light by social media?
  • What are you seeing in your classrooms? Are your students only using social media in a negative way? Or, if taught proper use, are they using it effectively to promote social change and amplify their voices?
Second podcast, brought to you by the Anchor App and Spotify. Debate 6: Cellphones should be banned in schools.

Kipp’s Debate 6 Questions:

  • LOTS OF QUESTIONS!
  • Do you think there’s a difference in cell phone use being effective in elementary/middle schools versus high schools?
  • Have you enforced a no-cell phone ban in your classroom/school/home?
  • If the ban is school-wide, are different teachers opposed to it?
  • Or, are you allowing cell phones in your classroom? How are you using it as a tool and “enforcing” mindful use in/out of the classroom?

Teaching Inside the Social Media Fishbowl

Debate 4: Post 4Educators have a responsibility to use technology and social media to promote social justice

Where my opinion on this debate started and where it ends (though I use that word loosely), has shifted throughout this week. I wanted my post to demonstrate my voice, as well as other voices, and so I tried something different (for me) using Canva. In the future maybe we can debate the likelihood of me throwing my computer out the window but in the meantime…

If you are time-strapped (and really, aren’t we all?), the first half of my video reviews the YAY and NAY key points and shared articles/videos. The second half of the video (11-minute mark) covers solicited opinions from peers/colleagues I respect, and my final reflections (attempts were made to NOT go off on rambling tangents, but….).

*Please note, I strive for inclusivity, but the closed captioning gods were not working with me today. Thank you for your understanding.

In the end, I firmly believe in positive intent and continual learning and unlearning of social justice issues. Everyone is at their own point in this journey; if you are comfortable and have capacity, I would be honoured if you shared your current position on this issue…

Instagram repost shared with permission: My current process/cycle as so eloquently summarized by Dr. Solomon

Hey Times Table, “Ya Basic!”

But is basic bad? Post 3: Debate 3

To quote Eleanor Shellstrop
GIF credit: The Good Place Memes

Another Monday evening and my brain is rumbling with all the new information laid out smorgasbord-style. Our first debate – Schools should no longer teach skills that can be easily carried out by technology (e.g., cursive writing, multiplication tables, spelling) – simultaneously had me questioning my reliance on unreliable tech while agreeing education needs a more innovative futuristic lens. Both sides presented such compelling, passionate cases I considered calling this: If My Blog is as Fuzzy as My Brain Right Now. I didn’t, and I’ll try to be clear as I outline the presented facts. For me, the question became: Does “basic” mean unnecessary? Let’s see what both sides have to say…

PRO points to consider

I can’t speak for the rest of the class, but in the pre-vote, I was Team PRO- ALL. THE. WAY. As a former student who struggled to learn multiplication facts and spelled I’ve as eyve, I managed to grow up to educate young minds. Sushmeet and Leah passionately outlined why our students deserve more than basic skills.

Survey says: Based on the survey shared on Discord (P.S. – such a brilliant strategy!) our class respondents heavily rely on technology to complete basic tasks, even though many of us come from a bygone era of basic skill drills. Why? Convenience. Should I strain my brain when Grammarly can spell restaurant for me (after my 6th attempt!)? And as someone who was diagnosed with dyscalculia too late in life for it to matter, using Siri as my verbal calculator feels like a godsend. Newsflash: Our teachers lied! We can carry calculators around with us every minute of the day!

Less menial more meaningful: With less focus on rote learning, students become free to create and explore. Cue flashback: It’s grade 3 and I am trying struggling to learn anything past 2X2. My mom buys a bootlegged tape (yes, Gen Z, I said a TAPE!) of multiplication songs. I finally learn my facts. I can sing 5X2=10, but I don’t understand why until I am much older.

Memorizing this…

Multiplication table
Photo credit: Adobe StockPack.

Has much less meaning than the awareness that an egg carton equals a real-world array.

Eggs in an egg carton on a white background. Isolated.
Wow! 5X2 really does equal 10!
Photo Credit: Adobe StockPack

Additionally, less focus on basic math skills allows more time for critical thinking tasks like makerspaces and coding. Hmmmm, would students rather look at a 2-D multiplication table or make a 3-D printing of an array city? I know what 9-year-old me would’ve said!

Less impersonal while more equitable: Rote learning often fails to consider the diverse needs (and circumstances) of each student. As discussed in previous debates, tech can provide a diversified approach to student interests and abilities. Likewise, with less focus on spelling (as if it somehow reflects a person’s character) more time can be used for relevant and humanitarian-based subjects: social justice, climate change, and the like. If you’ve read my other post on tech-equity (techquity?), you’ll know I am not a huge proponent of technology bridging the digital divide; however, in the Tedx Talk Re-inventing Education in the Digital Age, speaker David Middelbeck makes a compelling case for a digital shift in education. Technology (when and where available) can be used to help students struggling with basic math and grammar skills; they can then advance to more innovative and employable skills like coding.

Shift in teacher-student roles: As discussed in class, educational roles are changing. In the aforementioned Tedx Talk, Middelbeck outlines how education has consistently (albeit often too slowly) adjusted to meet the learning needs of society. The printing press marked an increase in class-inclusive education systems. The Industrial Revolution pushed an agenda of homogenous learning and capitalist advancement. Today, digital age educators are helping students use technology to ask and answer their own questions through creation and collaboration. With the use of such technology, how important is cursive writing for students in comparison to programs that allow ideas to flow across a shared screen?

Retro picture of classmates. Group of children in the classroom
Industrial Era classrooms…and you thought yours was packed!
Photo credit: Adobe StockPack

Other points like tech providing timely feedback and less bias were also discussed, but I’m not 100% sure these concepts exist in the “same lane” as the idea schools should no longer teach basic skills. Please feel free to argue this point with me! Until then, I’ll move on…

Aerial view of road interchange or highway intersection with busy urban traffic speeding on the road. Junction network of transportation taken by drone.
What lane am I in anymore?
Photo credit: Adobe StockPack

CON points to consider

Just when I thought I was firmly entrenched in the PRO camp, Alyssa, Kelly, and Durston presented their compelling reasons why basic doesn’t mean bad in education.

Current events versus current abilities: If ever there was a timely case for the necessity of basic skills in education, the ransomware situation at Regina Public has certainly provided a relevant anecdotal record. As my Regina-based classmates struggled with tasks ranging from photocopying to inputting report card data, I questioned if I could function without technology in the classroom? Short answer: As an online educator, I can’t. Obviously.

Even in a physical classroom, I flounder with certain basic skills. Thank God ransomware can’t attack calculators, but what would I do without one? The situation was posed in class: If a student asks a math equation and the teacher needs to walk across the classroom to grab a calculator, how bad does that look? Full disclaimer: In the past, I have frequently been that teacher. Of course, it’s not calculators that finally “saved” me – it’s (really) learning my basic math. Hurray for meaningful math strategies! Likewise, it took time and effort for me to master my spelling issues. As Grammarly seamlessly corrects my errors (while I type this), I am extremely grateful; however, without basic grammar skills, I could never catch the issues often missed by computer programs. Quite often, or at least in my case, it feels like basic skills must come before tech skills.

Me, trying to do math
(if I had a beard)
GIF credit: Tenor.com taken from The Hangover

Mental math before calculators: My anecdotal academic failings aside (are you shocked I actually made it as a teacher?!), let’s return to the data. In Mathematics Deficit: Why do Canadian Students Still Struggle in Math?, author P. Bennett provides some (disappointing) findings: “The most recent April 2021 Fraser Institute report on Mathematics performance of students across Canada contained very few surprises. . . . Steep declines have been registered by students from Alberta (- 38 points), British Columbia (-34 points), and Saskatchewan (- 31 points).” Why? Bennett stresses an over-reliance on calculators since the 1980s. In comparison “top performing nations, such as Singapore, China and Korea, put far more emphasis on integrating mental computation with conceptual understanding before progressing to higher-level math and problem-solving.” In simple terms, we have to lay structurally sound foundations (see: basic math) before we can expand our thinking confidently and creatively.

Grammar: A Schoolhouse Rock production: We’ve all read the (judgy) adage: “If you say ‘I seen’ rather than ‘I saw’ I will assume it’s never been the inside of a book!” (anon). Schoolhouse Rock, with its catchy beats, led us to believe that spelling and grammar act as windows to our minds. As discussed by the CON team, a lack of basic spelling and grammar skills can negatively impact a student’s future in the following ways:

  • Employability: Though arguably an antiquated and possibly costly practice, employers dismiss over 42% of resumes based on spelling errors.
  • Miscommunications: Students have valuable ideas, but grammatical issues can cause their concepts to be lost in translation.
  • Societal judgment: It’s not a point I like mentioning, but society is constantly judging us based on our grammatical/spelling skills. Whether applying to a university, writing a prescription, or creating a business site, grammatical mistakes can prove costly.
  • Societal Inequity: This one relates to all basic skills – if we assume technology will “fix” all student learning discrepancies, then we assume all students have access to these technologies in the first place.

Enter the case for programs like Grammarly and Readable. If grammar and spelling are so elitist and important, why not use assistive tech to help students? Every year, I have my students download Grammarly to their Chromebooks, and every year, the ones who don’t have basic grammar and spelling skills seem colour-blind to the glaringly obvious (to me) red squiggly lines. We cannot slap a grammar program on little Billy’s learning (dis)ability – brought about by a lack of literacy at home – and then wipe our hands clean. And as Durston noted in his team’s defense, we can’t just be waiting for future tech; our current technology is simply not there yet. I can attest to that as Grammarly tries to adjust my Canadian spelling to American for the millionth time (despite changing my settings a hundred million times!). It’s colour not color, Grammarly!

Grammar, saving lives
Photo credit: BookBub Memes

The case for cursive: I haven’t discussed cursive much because, as a person with a weird hybrid form of print-handwriting, I’m uncertain how much this skill has helped or hindered me….or any of my students. In its defense, cursive writing (when a mastered skill) is quicker than printing, allowing for flowing prose and speedy note-taking. Additionally, as noted in the Edutopia article What We Lose With the Decline of Cursive, cursive lights up the brain, activating increased memorization skills. For me, if I have to give up one basic skill for myself and my students, it will be cursive. From Egyptian hieroglyphics to Chinese Hanzi, the way we communicate using letters and images will continue to evolve (and I’m okay with that). Of course, I may just be bitter because my old-school, beautifully scripted mother, consistently judges my sloppy handwriting!

Basic ain’t so bad, and ain’t ain’t a word…

After all that thinking (and it’s been hours on this one topic alone), I have reached the conclusion that “basic” has its place in our lives, neither bad or unnecessary when used mindfully. Like technology, basic multiplication and grammatical skills must be used with purpose. I feel with certainty there is no purpose telling students, “Memorize these math facts! Why? Because that’s how it’s always been done!” Even if educators resisted the use of computers and/or programs, there are still a plethora of innovative, hands-on learning activities that can demonstrate basic concepts without relying on sit-and-get drill sheets. When we teach basic skills to show the why and how of learning, students can use these concepts as scaffolding for deeper level thinking. In their closing remarks, the PRO team quoted John Dewey: â€śIf we teach today’s students as we taught yesterday’s, we rob them of tomorrow.” I would argue that we cannot build for tomorrow if we do not understand yesterday.

Stay tuned for Debate 4 (which I haven’t named yet because I can no longer see straight)….Meanwhile, someone please save me from my own fuzzy thoughts/blog, what were your main takeaways from this debate?

Keeping Up with the Edtech Joneses

Part 2: Debate 2:

Poster adaptation of the well-known meme by C. Froehle

Full disclaimer:

I’ve been delaying my response to this debate. More than delaying, I’ve been intentionally avoiding. Our prompt- Technology has led to a more equitable society– hit(s) me differently, on a heart rather than head level. And once the ol’ heart is engaged, emotions and memories pin down my customary objectivity.

Despite being thoroughly vocal (probably too vocal) throughout the debate, I just kept thinking: Should I even have a voice at this table? Having taught at a Following Their Voices, community school for over a decade, my experience with educational equity isn’t minimal, and my current reliance on edtech remains high as an online teacher for 2-plus years. But (and it’s a big one)…as a third-generation white settler, cisgender female who is educated, employed, and housed, how unbiased (or necessary) is my viewpoint on equity…even when well-researched?

Trying to use my voice…

Instagram post, with permission from @theindigenousfoundation

While avoiding this…

Instagram post (2), with permission from @theindigenousfoundation

So we’ll stick to the facts then…(mostly)

PRO Points to Ponder

Even though (spoiler alert!) I pre-voted CON, there’s no disputing the myriad of ways technology is attempting to level the playing field, as so eloquently outlined by Tracy, Nicole and Stephen:

Teacher insight into student individual needs: Whether in-person or online, Canadian classrooms are becoming vastly overcrowded (please tell me this isn’t up for debate). Shy Sandy’s dyscalculia or behaviour Billy’s dyslexia can be easily missed in our sardine-tight classes. In the shared article, The Role of Technology in Reimagining School, authors Amundson and Ko observe: “[T]echnology can give teachers a bird’s-eye view of how students are solving problems. If a student is missing a critical step—forgetting the order of operations in a math problem, for example—the teacher can focus on that content.”

I’m a firm believer that relationships and conferring trump data management, gamification, and standardized anything, but in increasingly busy and crowded classrooms, having further insight into student needs definitely feels like an equitable band-aid.

Image courtesy of educatorstechnology.com
These are a few of my favourite things (and if you sang that like The Sound of Music, we should be friends).

The necessity of differentiated instruction: Further in The Role of Technology in Reimagining School, the authors note that “[t]echnology also makes it easier for teachers to share the work of developing differentiated
lessons. If every teacher is teaching two-digit
multiplication, one can develop games for skills
practice while another creates word problems.”

If equity is making sure everyone gets what they need to succeed, then differentiated instruction seems like an obvious must. Reading programs like Raz Kids and Essential Skills provide Katlyn with boredom-free challenging readings, while Abi gets the extra comprehension assistance she needs. When I look back at my own experience receiving the same Grade 7 fraction drill sheets as my brother, despite a 14-year age gap, these differentiated programs seem like a godsend for students and teachers. Of course (as was mentioned during class discussion) the danger lies in teachers viewing these sites as separate sit-and-get “solutions” for students, rather than personally investing time in individual needs.

Inclusivity via assistive technology: One doesn’t have to look far or hard to learn about Canada’s murky past with classroom inclusivity (on a multitude of levels). According to the timeline outlined by BC Disability: “During the 1800s, young persons with special needs were simply excluded from the education system and deemed burdens, often confined to institutions where they festered away in isolation.” It wasn’t until the 1920’s that the idea of equity in education began to take root within Canadian classrooms.

Inclusivity for students with special needs remains imperfect today but assistive technologies can help level the field:

  • Hearing impairments: Technology like personal FM Systems have been game-changers. At the start of my career, I was instructed, “If you have a deaf student in your classroom, try to speak loudly and face them as much as possible.” That was it – that was the strategy! As a partially deaf person for the past 3 years, my advocacy for FM (frequency modulation) systems has increased tenfold. In crowded, noisy classrooms, nothing can feel more isolating and overwhelming than not understanding the “where, what, and who” of every conversation. Something as simple as closed captioning during in-class learning or Zoom meetings makes all the difference for deaf or hard-of-hearing students (like myself).
Closed captioning sign
Photo credit: Adobe StockPack closed captioning
  • Visual Impairments: Classrooms are visually rich places, and visual aids can provide inclusive solutions for students with visual impairments. Something as simple as enlarged text to more advanced tech like video magnifiers and digital text programs. Four years ago I taught a student designated legally blind. With proper funding, he gained access to a video magnifier. It was all he needed to transform from disengaged and “behavioural” to one of the most creative, innovative students I have ever taught!
  • The list goes on…
digital transformation concept in business, disruption
Photo credit: Adobe StockPack

CON Points to Ponder

When our classrooms shut down 2.5 years ago, technology was used to keep educators and students connected. 1:1 laptops sent home and various online platforms were meant to lessen the learning strain; however, as Christina, Amaya, and Matt outlined, technology did not prove to be the great equalizer.

This is the section I’ve been dreading. To remain impartial; stick to the data and studies and avoid soap-boxes and white saviourism.

So if I stick to the facts and the issues proposed, these problematic concerns with equitable technology remain:

Disproportionate access and support: Even the article highlighted on the PRO side, The Role of Technology in Reimagining School, outlines the problematic nature of viewing technology as an equitable solution for all students in all classrooms and homes. Participants in the research group noted that “[h]alf of all respondents rated learning disparities as a significant challenge . . . Disparities that existed before the pandemic were in many cases exacerbated. The shift to remote learning was a blow to many students who were already vulnerable, particularly students of color and low income children and youth.”

While this data has been collected from the States, and we do not yet have any longitudinal studies, I can only speak to what I have experienced – much greater disparities than those highlighted in the aforementioned reading.

When the pandemic hit, my (biological) children’s very well-funded (see: parent committees and fundraisers) school shifted seamlessly online. 98% of students already had access to WIFI, 1:1 laptops/smart devices, printers, and parental support. In comparison, my community school (same town, same school division), bled our laptop supply dry…and then we begged for more. My children’s school had a 96% end-of-year completion rate, with almost 100% daily online presence in all classrooms. Amazing! My community school experienced an 80% drop in online presence; we lost families whose locations remain unknown today. As mentioned in our debate, my school (and others like it) shifted our focus to family mental health and food assistance. It became more important for little Johnny to eat than it was for him to finish Grade 4 math. As an aside: All statistics above are courtesy of the weekly 2020 email updates we received from our school division (not just numbers I randomly cite in my head).

North Battleford Food Bank
Photo Credit: News Optimist

The debate question was raised: Was this a Covid learning gap, which happened in all classrooms and countries? My answer is: This was an inequitable learning situation before, during, and certainly after our pandemic lockdowns. In the aftermath, we now know that technology- at least in our Saskatchewan schools- did not provide equal access to the same learning opportunities. Based on the experiences of EC&I classmates from other parts of the world, equitable access is certainly not a Saskatchewan-based problem either. But I digress…

Global digital divide: My teaching experience and email statistics aside, when looking on a global scale, the disparities remain alarming. In The Global Digital Divide, Khan Academy author, Pamela Fox uses interactive maps and statistics to highlight the remaining inequitable global data. The reasons listed by the author for this broadening gap? Infrastructure (largely based on government funding), geography (some places are more remote than others), difficult terrain, gender identity, and government restrictions (internet black holes, shutdowns, kill switches). Politics alone make it difficult to term technology as equity-driven.

Cost of data (2021) Statistics courtesy of Cable UK, World Bank / Photo credit: Orion Wilcox

Issues with “Big Tech” Companies: A major issue, and one I will be elaborating on in my own debate topic (just felt it was definitely worth noting).

 If not everyone has a seat at the table, can the table be equitable?

My final takeaways? The topic – Technology has led to a more equitable society– is exhaustive! Technology has created equalizing opportunities for a variety of learning styles, needs, and (dis)abilities. I’ve cried listening to a student communicate with me for the first time via assistive tech and basked in the sound of my noisy classroom, courtesy of my new hearing aids. These technological wonders; however, do not come without an (inequitable) price tag; one not everyone can afford. Any assistive tech in my school has required hours of teacher/parent/programming teamwork and advocacy (writing countless grant letters to places like Jordan’s Principle). Without that advocacy, and those “dollah-bills”? No tech to create equal access to learning opportunities. As stated by authors Kelly and Weeden in The Digital Divide Has Become a Chasm: Here’s How We Bridge the Gap: “[D]igital injustices are layered and complex, and reflect the systemic and structural barriers to full participation that have Canada’s disconnected digital policies. 

In short (or actually long…I know this is soooo long), there is work to be done. We cannot be distracted by flashy technology (though I do love it) or small gains in equal access (though some exist). If even one student goes without equitable learning solutions, then the system as a whole is not equitable. Not yet; not without continued awareness and advocacy.

Photo credit: Reader’s Digest

Mindful Tech, the Only Way Forward

Part 1: Debate 1

DING DING DING! It’s Monday night and the first round of our debates is in full swing. In the PRO corner stands an impressively well-versed Megan and Brittney; in the CON corner, the intimidatingly well-researched Nicole and Daryl. The match in question? Technology in the classroom enhances learning. All my money is betting on the PRO side.

Okay, okay, I’m no Michael Buffer (wait, did I just drastically age myself?). I’ll cut to the point: Before this debate, I was solely on the PRO side. As an online teacher for almost 3 years, how could I place my bets any other way? The vast majority of our class pre-voted PRO. In a world where education had to flip on a dime to embrace technology, there should be a clear winner…..or, maybe not?

3D boxer arena. Isolated empty boxing ring with light. 3D rendering. Boxing ring with illuminated spotlights
Photo Credit: Adobe StockPack

PRO Points to Ponder

Megan and Brittney did an amazing job neatly outlining key advantages of technology in the classroom:

Access to information and resources: A plethora of our textbooks are ridiculously priced while comically outdated. And with time, our colonizer roots show brightly against the backdrop of historical inaccuracies. Online updated information has a clear advantage in staying current when it’s well-sourced. Arguably, both the outdated textbooks and the (sometimes questionably sourced) online resources provide teachable moments in classrooms. Teachers, however, have to be trained and ready for those moments when they come….and they always do!

Increases engagement and skills for success: Hands-on, interactive content is available for the next generation of learners via 1:1 laptops, Smart and Promethean boards, VR, 3D printers, gamifying, coding, robotics, the list is ever-growing.  Of course, that’s IF your school has the funding for such things (a point I’ll get to….eventually in Part 2).

A teenage boy programs a copter drone on a scratch. STEM education. Modern technology and gadgets.
Photo credit: Adobe StockPack

Promotes collaboration and communication: Watching students enthusiastically collaborate while coding instructions for their battle-bots remains a career highlight for me. Without clear collaboration and communication, their bots lose…repeatedly. It’s a resilient mindset of lose, learn, lose, learn, win (maybe)!

Restructures teacher time: In the article Teaching in a Digital Age: How Educators Use Technology to Improve Student Learning, Journal of Research on Technology in Education, the researchers note: “When students ask questions, rather than providing answers, [teachers] now guide them to find and identify relevant information, and to evaluate the quality and validity of that information. For students, the shift was toward active, deeper learning, which aligned well with skills students need to be successful in college and the workplace.” Honestly, who can say it better than that?

Adaptations/accommodations: Who knows more about adaptations than students and educators these past few years? How would we have navigated learning in a pandemic without technology? Paper packages sent home (printed on photocopiers….cough, cough, technology!) and occasional teacher-student phone calls (old tech, but still tech). Not to mention, assistive technologies provide a host of accommodations for diverse learning styles and abilities, as well as visual and hearing impairments…..I could go on…

little boy during the hearing exam, showing thumbs up at the audiologist's office. audiogram, children ear exam
Photo credit: Adobe StockPack

CON Points to Ponder

Again, you’ll think I bet all my money on PRO, but Daryl and Nicole brought up many clear issues I have battled over the course of my (almost) 3-year online career:

Connections are artificial: Personally, I would argue that the relationships I have built with my online students, and students with each other, are anything but artificial.  As I sit in my lonely corner office and my isolated students in their homes, our relationships seem like lifelines to a greater world. It is worth noting, however, that these online relationships are mindfully and meaningfully tended. As mentioned by Nicole and Daryl, student presence on social media accounts can often be interpreted as surface-level and disingenuous.

Portrait of a sad girl with a smartphone in one hand and a smiling mask in the other hand.
Photo credit: Adobe StockPack

Erodes social skills and relationships: First off, there’s a lot of experience in the “Zoom-room” during these debates. Despite logistical and career differences amongst our class, there seemed a general consensus that student social skills, particularly face-to-face interactions, are increasingly….aaaawkward! From behind our masks and screens, have we forgotten how to interact? After some deep-diving (using tech, of course), there’s a surprising lack of longitudinal data to back up the idea that screen-time equals social incompetencies. I shouldn’t say, however, that initial studies have been favourable. Calgary psychologist Sheri Madigan, PhD, tested over 24000 mothers/infants and “found that more time per week spent on screens at ages 24 months and 36 months was linked with poorer performance on screening tests for behavioral, cognitive and social development at 36 months” (JAMA Pediatrics, Vol. 173, No. 3, 2019). Speaking of which…

5G Technology for Families concept.Everyone sitting in sofa and using digital devices in living room.Big family grandmother grandfather and kids spending time together at home.
Photo credit: Adobe StockPack

Pulls students away from the outside world: My comments here are purely anecdotal, but I cannot abide by family meal times centering on……screens! Mom texting, dad on an “important” call, and the kidlets, tweens, and teens distracted by their tablets and apps. If that’s the focus at home, what takes precedence at school? Unless educational technology is used mindfully in the classroom, and just as mindfully stored away, will the habitual hit of dop(amine) screen time always beckon our students to their digital world? And what is the “real world” anymore, anyway? These are the questions that keep me up at night (and your insights are most welcome)!

Tech is connected to a plethora of other health, mental and emotional issues: Obesity, sleep issues, anxiety/depression, socioeconomic disparities, limited attention spans….each one of these concerns is worthy of its own post (and does, in fact, take centre-stage in millions of research papers, books, podcasts…you get the idea). All signs point me to one main takeaway from this debate…

In the world of edtech, there are no clear winners; only shades of grey

Yes, I voted in favour of educational technology in the pre-vote, and yes, I’m part of that EC&I fraction who changed my opinion in the post-vote. GASP! I was shocked too! That’s not to say I think there were any clear winners, or the necessity for “winners”, in this debate. Like so many other things, the use of technology in the classroom requires objective consideration, and objectivity largely falls into life’s grey matter. On one hand, technological advancements will continue to take precedence in our classrooms and open up new worlds of engaged learning. On the other hand, technology poses an increasing threat to social, emotional and physical threats when used improperly. Two sides of the same coin. We cannot include technology in our classrooms for its own sake. Instead it must be used mindfully as a tool (amongst many), with clear purpose and training. Only through mindful use of technology will we be able to move forward with our students.

“[I]t’s … the instructional methods that cause learning. When instructional methods
remain essentially the same, so does the learning, no matter which medium is used to deliver
instruction.” (p.14)

Clark, R. C., & Mayer, R. E. (2011). E-learning and the science of instruction: Proven guidelines for consumers and designers of multimedia learning (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.

There was so much food for thought in these debates, please let me know your main takeaways. Were you PRO, CON, or happily sitting on the fence (munching popcorn) like me?

Stay tuned for Part 2/Debate 2:

Keeping up with the Edtech Joneses…

My So-called “New Normal”: Day in the Life of an OLST

When we reflect back on the last few years, I suspect (for many of us) a great divide appears between our relationship with educational technology before the pandemic and everything after. That has certainly been the case in my journey from classroom teacher to Online Learning Support Services Teacher.

Before…

As a geriatric millennial, I’m already familiar with the pre and post-technological world. Playing outside came well before my Nintendo and Oregon-Trail memories, and it wouldn’t be until my last years of high school that I researched science essays using my family’s noisy dial-up internet. Still, I was young enough to quickly adapt to the arrival of MySpace, Facebook, Ipods, and then…..oohhhh, ahhhhhhh, the Iphone!

January 2020: Miami FETC Convention (not a clue about the future)

My pre-pandemic classroom existed inside four solid walls. I greeted students face-to-face, using a variety of handshakes, high-fives, and questionable TikTok dance recreations. My pedagogy thrived on personal connection, interwoven with the necessity to stay tech-savvy, and therefore, relevant to my students. We used old Chromebooks to create videos, podcasts, Prezis, and Powerpoints. “Using technology is a tool to prepare you for your future,” I recited daily to my classes (little did I know).

January 2020: I am 1 of 4 educators chosen by my division to attend the FETC – Future of Education Technology Conference– in Miami. We are to source all the best tech- VR, robotics, coding- to bring back to our school division and teach teachers. The words pandemic and Covid-19 are new, whispered, and distant. We don’t know yet…

March 2020: Familiarizing myself with imovie and Youtube to help my school get students online

After(math)…

The surrealness of March 2020 led to a whirlwind crash course in all things Edtech, from TikTok instructionals to Youtube Read-Alouds and daily Zoom chats. Like any literary nerd, I wrote questionable op-eds and poetry to fill the void. The oddest part (that I only dare whisper aloud) is that I found myself thriving in this new online world. The creativity and connection required to engage students online seemed like a worthy and interesting undertaking.

Fast-forward to September 2020, and I am 2 hours into pandemic classroom teaching. Mask-up, shield down, heart terrified but full, I am ready and out for supervision when…I receive a phone call.

“Kim, would you be interested in the division’s new Online Learning Support Services Teacher role?” My superintendent asks.

They have no clear outline of what this position entails. I have no idea about…anything!

“Count me in!” I respond.

What did my mom always say to me about looking before I leap?

Instagram Screenshot: A day in the life
Case in point: I only tell my mother after I’ve lept!

The So-Called “New Normal”

Edsby: Where I spend most of my days creating content and communicating

More than two years later, 6-7 hours of my work-life is lived online. I still exist in my school’s four walls, but my office is shoved to a remote corner and my co-workers refer to me as “the happy hermit.” For better or worse, I see my face continually on a screen. Zoom and I are intimately acquainted. In my Division, I interact with every school, admin, teacher, and grade-level, connecting them all to our online students. Upon request, I create online content and curriculum resources for any and all grade levels. My job is to make the “new normal” in-school/online hybrid somehow easier. I try my best.

For the most part, I teach and connect using:

  • Zoom – till death do us part (or so it seems).
  • EDSBY – Just before the pandemic, my Division signed a contract with Edsby. It is now the main hub I use to communicate, share, and create.
  • A total hodge-podge: TikTok, Flipgrid, Peardeck, Kahoot, Blooket, Miro, whatever means necessary….including a diverse range of truly strange (non-tech related) costumes.

As for what’s to become of me and my role next year…it’s truly anyone’s guess. As always, I’ll leap first and learn on the way down!

Kipp Masters Her Masters

And so it begins…

Thanks for stopping in! My name is Kimberly but I answer to many names – Kim, Ms. K, Kipp, Kippy, Charlie (random, I know), mom- anything except Kimmy (please)!

My first (student) blog; the beginning of my Masters; yet another new chapter. I am all parts nervous and excited and bewildered….and grateful. So very grateful for this next step and anyone who joins me briefly or for the entire duration of this new adventure.

Just Kim

“We shall not cease from exploration, and

the end of all our exploring will be to

arrive where we started and know the

place for the first time.”

T.S. Eliot

Introducing…

Where to begin?

My pronouns are she/her and I am honoured to live on Treaty 6 land.  
In the last 13 years, I have taught every grade from 1-12, and for the past 2.5 years, I have been the K-7 Online Learning Support Teacher (OLST) for the Light of Christ School Division. 

RANDOM FACTS ABOUT ME:
1. My family consists of a husband, son, daughter, a friendly polar bear named Tank, and a small mountain lion named Arfield Jigglesworth (AJ).
2. This is actually an info dump, but I am super passionate about: creative writing, reading (largely fiction and personal growth), learning, hiking, travelling, my family, mental health, and environmental/social justice.
3. I have travelled to over 60 countries now, and (when able) I can’t wait to return to exploring this beautiful world with my family.

Thank you for stopping in at the beginning of this tale…