My Digital Identity

This week’s class brought a lot of reflection over my own practices when it comes to the identity I have built for myself online.

I started thinking about this topic last week when I watched my classmates Daina and Allison’s video Identity in a Digital World . In their video they reference the five types of online identities as proposed by the Cyber Intern Academy. This intrigued me because firstly I had not heard of this type of identity breakdown, but also because one of the descriptions fit my online usage so well. This was the as described “Identity #3 – Audience“. According to Daina and Allison “The Audience Identity is the most common identity used throughout the Internet.  One will use different social media platforms for different purposes.  For example, one will use Facebook to update about family news, upload photos, and provide status.  LinkedIn will be used to authorize one’s professional career, where he or she works, and what kind of professional experience or education they have.”

Personally, since I became employed as a teacher I scaled down my usage of Social Media entirely, and turned nearly all of my privacy settings to the most protected possible settings.

In terms of my professional life, I direct that content to my classroom’s Twitter account or my LinkedIn. Both of which I share publicly on my professional resume and therefore I keep all the content I post to either platform strictly professional. In fact up until this year when I began to use the Twitter personally for my Master’s Studies -the Twitter account served as a place that students and I co-curated as a class and even wrote in student voice on all the posts (in order to attempt to encourage parent engagement on the site).

Personally, other types platforms that I use I have either removed almost all personal information, pictures, and tagging or I have increased the privacy and only use the 24 hour posting features. I found this interesting to reflect on as we have mentioned time and time again in class how we believe that we should not use fear based tactics to teach students how to navigate digital spaces. Yet, though I know nothing I post is offensive, insensitive or unkind – yet I hide much of my digital identity behind privacy settings due to my cautiousness over the high standard teachers are held to in terms of the digital identity we cultivate.

After watching Dean’s Video I pulled up all of my websites and platforms where I have some sort of digital presence and tried to piece together an identity from there.

Reoccurring themes:

Auntie Life:

Education/Technology:

Indigenous Language Education:

I can live with this being the picture I paint of myself for now.

That being said, I was examining my digital identity through the lens of what I know I want to project – I have no clue as to what story our online sleuthing activity would tell of me and that concerns me. While I take great care to curate the information I create online, I do not know what pockets of my personal information and data I have allowed to be spread across the internet based on the websites and applications I use.

I have decided a goal moving forward would be to more closely examine the access I have granted to my personal information, and how that reflects on my digital identity.